Speakers

Opening Keynote:

Sir Timothy Gowers

Timothy Gowers is currently a Royal Society Research Professor and also holder of the Rouse Ball Chair in Mathematics at the University of Cambridge. He was a scholar at Eton College and then studied mathematics at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he also did his PhD, and where he is now a fellow. In 1998 he was awarded a Fields Medal, and in 2012 he was knighted for services to mathematics. In addition to his research, he has a keen interest in open science, especially as applied to mathematics, organising a large-scale open online collaboration that quickly led to the solution of a significant open problem. In recent years he has campaigned for scientific literature to become more open and for the cost of journals to reflect the greatly reduced cost of disseminating information in the internet age. As part of that effort, he was a founding editor of Discrete Analysis, an arXiv overlay journal with running costs that are a tiny fraction of those of a typical traditional journal.  Sir Timothy Gowers’s Blog http://gowers.wordpress.com

Keynote: Perverse incentives: how the reward structures of academia are getting in the way of scholarly communication and good science.

The internet has been widely used for the last 20 years and has revolutionized many aspects of our lives. It has been particularly useful for academics, allowing them to interact and exchange ideas far more rapidly and conveniently than they could in the past. However, much of the way that science proceeds has been affected far less by this development than one might have expected, and the basic method of communication of ideas — the journal article — is not much different from how it was in the seventeenth century.

It is easy to imagine new and better methods of dissemination, so what is stopping them from changing the way scientists communicate? Why has the journal system proved to be far more robust than, say, the music industry, in the face of the new methods of sharing information?

 

 

xiaolin-zhang_edClosing Keynote:

Dr Xiaolin Zhang

Dr. Xiaolin Zhang is the former Director (2004-2015), National Science Library (NSL), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). With a Physics degree for his undergraduate study, he then graduated from Columbian University in USA in 1984 with a Master of Science degree and in 1992 with a DLS degree. His research interests cover digital libraries, knowledge organization, data-driven knowledge discovery, and open access. He has been active in promoting open access in China, playing a major role in designing OA policies of CAS and Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC). He has initiated the development of the Institutional Repository Grid of CAS since 2009, China OA Weeks since 2012, and China IR Conference since 2013. He is now the leader of the China IR Implementation Group, the leader of the implementation group for the National Digital Preservation System for Scientific Publications, the PI for the NSFC project on Open Access Policy, and the PI for the CAS project on Open Science and Scientific Policy. Dr. Zhang was a member of IFLA Governing Board and Professional Committee from 2005-2009, and is now a Vice President of China Society of Library Science. He serves as one of the Co-Chief Editors of Journal of Data and Information Science (in English), and Chief Editor for Modern Library and Information Technologies (in Chinese).

Keynote: Beyond Repositories: From Resource-oriented towards Problem-solving-oriented

With the ubiquitous deployment of digital ecosystems, developing repositories to meet next generation needs and functions become an imperative and increasingly active efforts. However, a paradigmatic shift may be needed to prepare repositories to go outside the resource-orientation box, as JISC report “The future of data-driven decision making” puts it, “[I]t is not sufficient simply to focus on exposing, collecting, storing, and sharing data in the raw. It is what you do with it (and when) that counts”.

The presentation first discusses the emerging digital ecosystems in research, learning, publishing, smart campus/cities, knowledge analytics, etc. where traditional content/repositories are just a small part of stories.

Then an exploration is made about making repositories embedded into, integrated with, and proactively contributing to user problem-solving workflows in digital ecosystems such as scholar hub, research informatics, open science, learning analytics, research management, and other situations.

Further effort is attempted to understand (admittedly preliminarily) strategies for repositories to be transformed into part of problem-solving-oriented services, including, but not limited to, 1) enhancing the interoperability to be re-usable to third part “users”, 2) developing repositories into smart content with application contexts, and 3) developing smart contextualization capabilities to better serve multiple, varied, and dynamically integrating problem-solving processes.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save